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Hurricane Harvey downgraded to Category 1 with 90 mph winds

Hurricane Harvey continues to hammer Texas with a deluge of wind and rain as communities and emergency responders prepare for rescues and damaged assessment amid potential flash flooding and tornadoes across the state's Gulf Coast.
The massive hurricane -- which is now a Category 1 storm as of early Saturday after making its initial landfall, slamming into the Gulf Coast of Texas at 10 p.m. local time Friday as a Category 4 storm -- unleashed a vicious wrath of torrential rain and 130 miles per hour maximum sustained winds with even stronger gusts, according to the National Weather Service.
When Harvey made landfall over the northern end of San Jose Island between Port Aransas and Port O'Connor, the storm's eye was 30 miles away from the Texas coastal city of Corpus Christi.
PHOTO: This satellite image shows Hurricane Harvey approaching the coast of Texas, Aug. 25, 2017, at 7:30 PM.
NASA/AFP/Getty Images
This satellite image shows Hurricane Harvey approaching the coast of Texas, Aug. 25, 2017, at 7:30 PM.
But the storm's Category 4 status was relatively short-lived. About three hours after making landfall, Harvey was said to be a Category 3 storm as its maximum sustained winds decreased to 125 mph. Around the same time, the storm made a second landfall in Texas on the northeastern shore of Copano Bay.
PHOTO:
SLIDESHOW: Slideshow: Hurricane Harvey slams Texasmore +
Then around 3 a.m. local time Saturday, Harvey was reported as a Category 2 storm as its maximum sustained winds decreased to 110 mph. By 5 a.m. local time, Harvey's maximum sustained winds dropped to 90 mph and the storm was downgraded to a Category 1.
As of 9 a.m. local time, the storm continued to weaken, with maximum sustained winds down to 75 mph, but the threat of potentially devastating storm surge and rain remained. At that time, the storm's eye was located about 25 miles away from Victoria, Texas.
As Harvey pummeled Texas overnight, reports emerged of structural damages, power outages and injuries.
Here's what you need to know about the strongest storm to hit the Lone Star State in decades:

What's ahead: Rain, flooding, tornadoes

What can Texans expect from this storm as it hovers over the region? Rain -- and lots of it.
At 2:30 a.m. local time Saturday, the National Weather Service in Corpus Christi reported that as much as 9.6 inches of rain had already fallen in Texas. An additional 25 to 35 inches of rain is forecast to accumulate through Wednesday.
By 5 a.m. local time Saturday, a weather monitoring station near the city of Victoria, some 85 miles northeast of Corpus Christi, reported that 16.43 inches of rain had accumulated in the area in the past 24 hours. However, the National Weather Service in Corpus Christi later on Saturday morning tweeted that that the rainfall report is likely "erroneous."
The highest rainfall amount that ABC News meteorologists are currently aware of is 10.54 inches in Aransas, Texas.
A flash flood warning was in effect Saturday for several Texas communities, including Portland, Ingleside and Rockport, according to the National Weather Service.
PHOTO: Luis Perez watches waves crash against a jetty in Galveston, Texas as Hurricane Harvey intensifies in the Gulf of Mexico, Aug. 25, 2017.David J. Phillip/AP
Luis Perez watches waves crash against a jetty in Galveston, Texas as Hurricane Harvey intensifies in the Gulf of Mexico, Aug. 25, 2017.more +
Tornadoes are also a concern as there is a high risk of them in the region.
A tornado watch was issued Saturday in the early morning hours for parts of Texas and Louisiana. The warning was expanded inland and extended through much of Saturday, according to ABC News meteorologist Daniel Manzo.
ABC News affiliate KTRK reported that a possible tornado was spotted in Texas' Fort Bend County.
PHOTO: Road signs near Corpus Christi, Texas, on August 25, 2017, show the impact of Hurricane Harvey.Justin Horne/KSAT
Road signs near Corpus Christi, Texas, on August 25, 2017, show the impact of Hurricane Harvey.
Here's a projected timeline for Hurricane Harvey so far, according to forecasts from the National Weather Service:
Saturday: Since Harvey roared ashore late Friday evening, the storm's path going forward remains uncertain. It is forecast to meander near or just inland of the middle of the Texas coast through the weekend.
Sunday through Monday: Some forecast models show Harvey expanding across the Gulf Coast as it makes its way over southern Texas.
Tuesday through Wednesday: The hurricane could, according to some models, move northeast and then re-emerge briefly over the Gulf of Mexico before making a second landfall in northeastern Texas or western Louisiana.

Injured residents

The full extent of injuries in Texas overnight remains unclear. Around midnight local time, Rockport City Manager Kevin Carruth said a total of 10 people were being treated for injuries stemming from Harvey.
Among the wounded were those at a senior housing complex, where the roof collapsed. Rescuers were able to transport the injured to a local jail that was serving as a makeshift medical center, Carruth said.

Damaged structures

Because the storm hit late at night, the damage it has caused won't be fully revealed until daylight.
In Rockport, some 31 miles northeast of Corpus Christi, the city manager told ABC News that multiple buildings had been damaged, including the courthouse and the public school. The coastal community experienced peak wind surges of more than 125 mph overnight, according to the National Weather Service.
Rockport Volunteer Fire Department Chief Steve Sims told ABC News early Saturday that about 22 firefighters were still hunkered down at the local fire station. The department has about 25 to 30 pending calls, and firefighters are anxious to help, Sims said, but they aren't able to respond until weather conditions improve and it's safe for them to travel.
Sims said search and rescue missions, as well as an assessment of the damage to the city of about 10,000 people, won't likely launch until later Saturday morning.
"We're unable to get out on the streets yet," Sims told ABC News. "As soon as the weather permits us, the winds get anywhere reasonable. We have been working on lists trying to prioritize the calls that we have waiting."
Fortunately, Sims said, the firehouse has fared well in the storm thus far.
"It rattled, it shook, but made it through it," he said.
PHOTO: Craig Cajun Uggen, 57, nearly floods his truck as Hurricane Harvey comes ashore in Corpus Christi, Texas, Aug. 25, 2017. Brian Thevenot/Reuters
Craig "Cajun" Uggen, 57, nearly floods his truck as Hurricane Harvey comes ashore in Corpus Christi, Texas, Aug. 25, 2017.more +
PHOTO: Outside of the CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, Aug. 25, 2017, as Hurricane Harvey moves towards the Texas coast.Courtney Sacco/Caller-Times via USA TODAY NETWORK
Outside of the CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, Aug. 25, 2017, as Hurricane Harvey moves towards the Texas coast.more +
Meanwhile, images out of Corpus Christi showed flooded streets, destroyed buildings and debris.
In Missouri City, a reporter with ABC News affiliate KTRK tweeted photos of downed trees and houses without roofs.
In Fort Bend County, Major Chad Norvell of the sheriff's office tweeted, "Confirmed roof torn off by possible tornado on Vieux Carre in Sienna. Minor injuries reported."
A subsequent tweet said, "Minor damage to other homes in Sienna. Trees down."
In Victoria, an Exxon station was also damaged by severe winds, and street signs were strewn across thoroughfares.

Power outages

As of 7 a.m. local time Saturday, some 293,000 customers were without power along Texas' Gulf Coast due to Hurricane Harvey's wrath, according to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), which manages the flow of electric power to 24 million Texas customers, representing 90 percent of the state's electric load.
On Friday at 10:07 p.m. local time, around the time Harvey made landfall, ERCOT said 104,000 customers were already without power.

How officials are responding

President Donald Trump tweeted Saturday morning that he's "closely monitoring" the storm from Camp David, the rustic presidential retreat Camp David in Frederick County, Maryland.
In an earlier tweet, the president cheered on Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Brock Long saying, "You are doing a great job - the world is watching! Be safe."
FEMA is also "closely" monitoring the storm and "working around the clock to prepare and support" efforts on the ground, Brock said in a tweet Friday morning.
Storm preparations began earlier this week in both Texas and Louisiana. As of Friday morning, FEMA had amassed more than 96,000 liters of water, 306,000 meals and 4,500 tarps at incident support bases in Seguin and Fort Worth, Texas, as well as in Camp Beauregard, Louisiana, should the states need them.
FEMA officials were also in New Orleans on Friday working to make sure the Louisiana city's pumps are functioning in anticipation of the 7 to 10 inches of rainfall expected there. The National Guard had also readied 500,000 sandbags, FEMA said.
As of Saturday morning, the American Red Cross had opened 21 shelters where 1,352 people displaced by the storm were staying. A spokesperson for the organization told ABC News they also have hundreds of trained disaster relief workers in Texas as well as truckloads of kitchen supplies, tens of thousands of ready-to-eat meals and trailers packed with shelter supplies that include cots and blankets.
Meanwhile, the Coast Guard responded to "vessels in distress" near Port Aransas on Saturday morning, after its Corpus Christi sector received "mayday notifications from crewmembers aboard the tugboats Belle Chase, Sandy Point, and Sabine Pass."
Two MH-65 Dolphin helicopter aircrews were deployed from the Coast Guard's air station in Corpus Christi to assist the rescue.
“As information continues to come in to the Coast Guard, we continue to monitor and respond to any situations for safety of life at sea,” Capt. Tony Hahn, commander of Coast Guard Sector Corpus Christi, said in a statement Saturday morning.
Aircraft were also deployed from Corpus Christi "to conduct patrols and assess damage" in the area with the intent of reopening the port of Brownsville, the Coast Guard said while urging Texas residents to "stay safe and not venture out while storm damage is assessed." Other crews in shallow-draft vessels, capable of responding in flooded urban areas, headed to parts of Texas and Louisiana.
ABC News' Brittany Borer, Lucien Bruggeman, Christopher Donato, Erin Dooley, Michael Kreisel, Jonah Lustig, Daniel Manzo and Brendan Rand contributed to this report.

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